Celtine (Κελτίνη) was the daughter of the Celtic King Bretannus. Celtine is known for having been one of the consorts of Herakles. Her story, recorded by Parthenius of Nicaea, is as follows.

When Herakles was driving the cattle of Geryon to Greece, he stopped at Bretannus' house. Celtine fell in love with her father's guest and tricked him into consorting with her: she hid away the kine and told Herkcles that in order to get the herd back, he had to content her. Herakles, both anxious to bring the cattle safe to King Eurystheus and overcome by Celtine's beauty, consented. From their union was born a son Celtus, eponym of the Celts

Spouse & Lovers

Herakles (lover)

Children

Celtus

Ancient Text

Hercules, it is told, after he had taken the king of Geryones from Erythea, was wandering through the country of the Celts and came to the house of Bretannus, who had a daughter called Celtine. Celtine fell in love with Hercules and hid away the kine, refusing to give them back to him unless he would first content her. Hercules was indeed very anxious to bring the kine safe home, but he was far more struck by the girl’s exceeding beauty, and consented to her wishes; and then, when the time had come round, a son called Celtus was born to them, from whom the Celtic race derived their name.

Or Geryon, who was supposed to have lived in Spain. This one one of the twelve labours of Hercules.


- Parthenius, Love Romances, 30

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